Month: October 2016

Ruckin’ With You | 10.31.16 | I’m Off . . .

. . . to NaNoWriMo later at 12:01 AM. Hello. Figured I’d better fire off what might be the last Ruckin’ missive for a few weeks. As I finally embark on the NaNo endeavor I’m going to make the best attempt at radio silence that I can because I’m like our family dog who is easily distracted by squirrels, rabbits, chipmunks, frogs and all other manner of lively distractions. Will be doing what I call a writing monk’s existence. No TV (with perhaps one exception — TWD). No social media (except before bed and upon waking), no reading comics; MAYBE only read prose, no guitars, no videogamses, no nothing really. Sounds like punishment, but I’m not so good with the kind of self-discipline required for someone trying to get a significant portion of a novel written in any given span of time. Thus, drastic measures are in order. #Write-Or-Flight Blocked Shot Received a submission rejection sometime last week. It’s the first rejection I’ve received in a long time. Also the first submission I’d made in a year …

Quote | Clive Barker on Characters

This week I’ve found a poignant quote from another writer I’ve looked up to since I started writing in the mid-90s, someone’s whose imagination and vision I greatly admire. Like Anne Rice from a few weeks back, Clive Barker is another fellow Libra. This quote comes from an old interview I stumbled across that was conducted in 1991 by W.C. Stroby for Writer’s Digest. WD: When the story ideas begin to get very bizarre or complex, what can you do to make sure you don’t lose that sort of emotional under-pinning? BARKER: The first thing is you’ve got to believe in the characters. You’ve got to be thinking with the characters and you’ve got to be within their skins. If you’re within their skins then their response to any situation, however bizarre it is, is going to be based upon your sense of them. Any writer’s belief in his or her characters – or the situations in which the characters find themselves – is central to his ability to convince the audience. As a writer, you have …

Notebook 8 | . . .

Shit. I’ve gotten into that weird mode of only wanting to write. I had planned on reading tonight and sat down with a couple of books, a novel and an anthology, and couldn’t bring myself to turn the pages. Grabbed a stack of comics and they couldn’t keep my attention past a couple of pages either. Maybe it’s just the stressful day at work that’s soured my mood and made me listless this evening. Month-end is always intense and the flurry of needy emails severely grate on my nerves. Friday and Monday at work will no doubt be their own special versions of Hell. Or maybe I’m just anxious about starting NaNoWriMo in less than a week. Since I’ve been trying to wrap and tidy up other things prior to starting, I haven’t exactly prepped myself for THE literary endeavor of the year, aside from mentally. Well, I do have a summary written and some other conceptual notes from the summer when the idea originated in my noggin. I need to tweak the summary some. Write a …

Reggie Lutz on NaNoWriMo

It is almost here… NANOWRIMO – http://wp.me/p5VuTN-6u Old writing buddy and ‘friend of the program’ Reggie Lutz shares some sage words. She’s on-point as usual, so do yourself a favor and have a read of her post regarding NaNoWriMo. Here’s an excerpt: One of the most important things around fiction writing is learning how to finish work that you start. This is a road toward a complete first draft. While the word count requirement to win NanoWrimo is not, strictly speaking, book length, it is enough word count to determine, at the end of it all, whether your story idea will work once you’ve polished it. Whether or not you have something workable at the end of it, you will have learned whether the kamikaze approach to writing 1,700 words a day works for you. That’s not nothing. if you are a person who has already started and finished long work then maybe the challenge for you is producing content at a relatively blistering pace. Doing this can teach you how to work with deadlines and …

NaNoWriMo 2016 – I’m In!

#NaNoWriMo #InItToWinIt So this past weekend I got myself signed up for NaNoWriMo 2016. I’ve been wanting to do this since about 2008 or so, but have never fully committed. When I first became aware of this National Novel Writing Month I was hosting a novel writing workshop over on Zoetrope.com (the Virtual Studio) where we posted novel chapters weekly for reads, reviews and discussion. It was a basically a support group for new novelists The novels I was flirting with writing back then simply would not have been ideal for something like NaNoWriMo because I am a meticulous plotter and in order to realistically reach the goal of 50,000 words in one month’s time (whew!), you have to embrace writing with little-to-no editing as you go along. Pantsing, it’s called — writing by the seat of your pants completely untethered by the act of editing and revising. I’ve been in hardcore, OCD edited mode since the first days of being an editor in 2000. You see, when you’re an editor of other people’s work …

Project Zero-13 | A Work in Progress

{ 744 words began Jan 7, 2010 } Stirred by the furtive movements of what was likely a rodent of some kind sniffing about in the foliage that surrounded him, the man awoke with a slight disorientation while lying under a bed of leaves, mud and twigs.  Vivid images of the dream he was having still lingered in his mind.  Like most dreams it was not an exact documentary of actual events, although inspired by them.  Instead it deviated from the script, as dreams often did.  A certain degree of surrealism had replaced realism.  Just before he was awakened, he had experienced the dream’s unscripted happy ending which was in direct contrast to the real life events he experienced prior to arriving to these woods to elude capture from his unknown pursuers. The happy ending was that he actually knew more than just his first name; that he knew exactly why he wore the strange costume, that underneath it was not some man that no one knew, and that he had the ability to speak.  …

Bleed to Live | Lyrics

It’s been some time Since I grabbed my guitar and played Not long ago I didn’t know if I’d be here today The blood in my veins Is like a curse, yet it blesses me I put up a fight But now I’ve learned just to let it be I learned that day That I will never be the same It’s like they say That there’s no gain without some pain There’s no cure There’s no chance for a better way And now I know I’ve got to bleed just to live today Push the needle in Get your insulin A cushion for the pen Fallen to your knees Begging pretty please Fuck this damn disease It just goes to show That pain is what you know Cause sugar is your foe If you want to live Your freedom’s what you give You’ve got to bleed to live Not long ago I didn’t know if I’d be here to say That now I know I’ve got to bleed just to live today Words written: July …

Linkage | 10.22.16

WP Links What it Takes to Be a “Real” Writer – via Kristen Lamb Write What You Know (NaNoWriMo Prep Part 2) – via Rachel Poli In Defence Of NaNoWriMo – via Holly Evans Links Abroad National Novel Writing Month – Sign up! How To Cope With Feeling Unsupported as a Writer Writer’s Toolbox    

Writing Advice from Neil Gaiman

This has made the rounds to various web places over the years, most notably in an article at The Guardian. 8 Rules for Writers by Neil Gaiman 1 Write. 2 Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down. 3 Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it. 4 Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is. 5 Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong. 6 Fix it. Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving. 7 Laugh at your own jokes. 8 The main rule of writing is that if you …

Ruckin’ With You | 10.16.16 | I Am Returned

Family vacation is over. A good time was had. But it’s over and today I deal with the looming return to work on a gloomy overcast day with some rain after a week of blue skies and sunshine. Woe is me, right? At any rate, overall we enjoyed our time in the mid-North states of Pennsylvania, New York and Ohio. On My Mind I arrived home with a great deal on my mind in terms of stories and writing. It seems my intense focus on the launch of my Library of Works website, RUCKERPEDIA, has got me so immersed in my past work that it’s served to inspire me on to current and future work. This past year the concept of a writer’s body of work, particularly MY body of work, has been very intriguing to me. Heck, it’s a huge reason why I built the RUCKERPEDIA website – inherently as an archive it serves as a virtual monument to my more than two decades as a writer. Essentially, were I to meet an untimely demise, …