All posts filed under: Comics History

Image Comics: So Much Damage | SYFY Documentary

Aside from not getting a lot of new information (for those of us who’ve been around since then), the one bad thing about these kinds of documentaries is how they tend to get the chronology all wonky. You don’t cover the start of Robert Kirkman’s The Walking Dead (October 2003) and say THEN Powers (April 2000) came out and Brian Michael Bendis was fired by Todd McFarlane off of Sam & Twitch (series debuted in August 1999) and also say he then went on to write Marvel’s Ultimate Spider (also started in 2000) and Alias – Jessica Jones (later in 2001). Or how about toward the end when they had a footnote saying that Kirkman’s Outcast TV show debuted in the year 2010, the same year as TWD TV show? Smh. There were a couple of other examples. I believe it’s important to get that kind of minutiae as precise and accurate as possible when presenting a historical documentary. That’s often compromised when things are edited for bite-sized consumption. [end nerd rant]. At any rate, it’s always …

FANTASTIC FOUR Documentary (video w/ Jack Kirby art)

This is must-see for anyone who truly appreciates the history of comics and the pioneers of the art form and industry. Unless you’re very young, uninformed or simply live under a rock, then you know how special the collaboration between Stan Lee and Jack Kirby was most notably in the 1960s. The Marvel Comics of yesterday, today and tomorrow would not be possible were it not for they synergistic collaboration of those two men creator what we know as Marvel Comics (and movies and TV) today. And I gotta say those images and pages of Kirby’s look so beautiful! I would love to have all 101 issues plus the annuals now. I had a few of Stan & Jack’s run as a kid, sprinkled in with the Silver & Bronze Age comics I’d acquired in the mid-1980s. At the time as a young teenager obsessed with comics, but all about the present offerings, I hadn’t yet possessed the proper respect and regard for the old stuff that I that I thankfully developed later in life.

CELEBRATE IMAGE DAY ON WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

On February 1, 1992, seven comics superstars Erik Larsen, Jim Lee, Rob Liefeld, Todd McFarlane, Whilce Portacio, Marc Silvestri, and Jim Valentino came together to form their own company that would change the landscape of comics forever. Current partners McFarlane, Valentino, Kirkman, Larsen, and Silvestri collectively have brought creator-owned comics to the forefront of industry change and, after 25 years of amazing storytelling freedom, Image is pleased to celebrate the milestone anniversary with Image Day—Feb. 1, 2017. Image Comics wouldn’t have succeeded without the tremendous creativity and passion of its creators, the unwavering support of retailers, bookstores, and libraries, or the unbridled and unrelenting enthusiasm of the fans who show up each and every Wednesday to purchase Image titles. On Image Comics Day we celebrate together, nationwide, the exciting legacy that Image’s creator-owned publishing model has cultivated as we prepare for the next 25 years of amazing creator-owned comics to come. There will be Image Comics promotions, giveaways, creator signings, social media events, and more—don’t miss out on all the festivities and check back to …

Perspective: State of the Comics Industry in 1999 via Warren Ellis

– by Brandon L. Rucker – So for the first time in well over a decade I am re-reading COME IN ALONE, the trade paperback collection of Warren Ellis‘ year-long column at Comic Book Resources that ran from December 1999 to December 2000. It’s a starkly honest observation and analysis of the seriously ailing comics industry of the time. Surely you all remember that bleak time period: post-early-90s boom, and post-mid-90s bust, yet prior to slight post-911 rebound? For me personally it was a time most significantly marked by the horrible decision of Image Comics standout partner Jim Lee to sell his widely popular and successful (and much beloved) WildStorm Productions publishing company along with all characters and intellectual property assets to DC Comics/AOL Time Warner (as the parent conglomerate was called at the time). That’s how bleak a time it was, that one of the industry’s richest, smartest and most powerful creator/businessman found it wise to sell his company as well as his Image Comics partnership stake (and some would argue his soul) to a competitor …