All posts filed under: Review

The Merc with a Mouth in a Movie | Thoughts on the Deadpool flick

Originally posted @ Comic Book Fetish | By  Brandon L. Rucker For an action movie with a foulmouthed blabbermouth antihero, it’s pretty good. The opening sequence let’s you know right away (and any parents who may have foolishly brought their little ones expecting Spider-Man, Iron Man or Captain America fare) what the nature of this movie is going to be about and what kind of content you can expect. The opening credits laced throughout that first sequence are written in Deadpool’s unique perspective, which also informs the flavor of this raucous, ultra-violent movie. Right away we see Deadpool doing what he does best, delivering graphic and gruesome punishment to bad(der) guys, all the while quickly rolling off a litany of witty, wisecracking one-liners off his swift tongue for all the chuckles, usually in voice-over or while looking right at us, breaking the fourth wall. The camera angles in these first few sequences are daring for great comedic effect.  You come to realize without a doubt during this first zippy action sequence that that Ryan Reynolds is …

Straight Outta Compton | It’s Not A Documentary

To put the bottom line at the top here: I came straight outta the movie theater last weekend  thoroughly entertained by this N.W.A biopic. At least on a popcorn movie level. What served me and my unfettered enjoyment going in is the acknowledgment of the inherent nature of the biopic. Firstly, you can’t effectively distill 29 years – or in the case of the movie’s timeline, a dozen years or so – into a 2.5 hour movie. Even in trying to include as many key moments as possible, a great deal of the “bio” aspect is going to be left on the cutting room floor, if shot at all. Secondly, this is not a documentary, it’s a Hollywood movie with a story, a screenplay, actors and a director (among countless other collaborators and interested parties), which means a plot of the story that is inspired by real-life and real events has to be agreed upon by the respective powers-that-be before the green light can be lit. Given those two elements, there’s naturally going to be …

GALILEE by Clive Barker

Clive Barker’s 1998 unrivaled tenth novel Galilee  (subtitled as “A Romance” inside the cover, and also known as Galilee: A Novel of the Fantastic) is hands down one of the greatest novels I’ve ever read.  It became the inspiration for a novel series I’d thought up one cold winter evening earlier this year.  It’s funny that I’ve found myself virtually connected to it.  If you were to do a Google search of the book, one of the top links that shows up leads to a review I did of it on goodreads.com back in summer of 2011.  It shows up at the top on goodreads.com because it is the highest rated review for the book by the members there.  I had no idea of this until just recently when I was looking for info links on the book to share with my co-writer. Here’s the four years old text from that review: _____________________________________________________ Galilee, for me, is Clive Barker at his storytelling best. It may not be as inventive as Cabal (Nightbreed), Imajica & Everville, or as …

PROMO & REVIEW: Paperboy: A Dysfunctional Novel

I now have in my anxious hands my signed copy of Bob Thurber’s debut novel, Paperboy: A Dysfunctional Novel (Casperian Books, 2011), for early review as I am officially a part of the promotional campaign leading up to and after its May 2011 release. So this will not be the last posting about this special book. What I have read so far is classic Thurber: a story about damaged people finding their way, told through his most intimate first-person voice yet, and prose so keen you’ll cut your eyes reading it.  Thurber doesn’t pad his word count like many literary writers do, his prose is very economic. But don’t let this fool you into thinking the writing is bare, it’s quite the contrary. Each sentence feels robust because he makes every word count; he doesn’t overwrite. He simply tells you everything you need to know in the most direct and efficient way. In other words, he’s more storyteller than writer; he gets out of the way to allow the character and story be the star rather than himself. I have always raved …