All posts filed under: Reviews

Lazarus #27: Jonah Carlyle . . . Long Lost and Found

After a long layoff of a full year (and some change), I am so happy to finally have  LAZARUS proper back into my hands, gracing my eyeballs! When last we received an issue of LAZARUS written solely by co-creator/author Greg Rucka and artist exclusively by co-creator/artist Michael Lark, it was March 2017’s LAZARUS #26, the conclusion of the “Cull” storyline which saw the Russian family Vassalovka — a deadly new piece on the LAZARUS chessboard — make their devastating assault. Well, with a presumably recharged Lark back in the groove of producing awesome pages again, issue #27 arrives as the first of a 2-part prelude to “Fracture”, the next multi-part storyline which promises to bring major changes as this wonderfully intricate and progressive story moves forward. In the intervening months between issues #26 & 27 there was a 6-issue miniseries, LAZARUS: X+66 (co-written and drawn by various creators) that served to chronicle some key side-characters and events that get us from year X+64 to where we’ll eventually arrive in year X+67 when “Fracture” starts. Thankfully issues #27 & …

SAGA #51: Middle-Aged, Poised and Graceful

At just past the would-be half-way mark of what’s speculated to likely be a 100-issue epic creator-owned series, SAGA is that comfortable, reliable favorite series that you come to simply expect to deliver exactly what you need from a series — not unlike a favorite TV showing deliver the goods each and every week of the season. That’s exactly what I experienced reading Chapter Fifty One. Saga’s vast cast of characters never fail to be compelling from scene to scene, issue to issue. The plots never meander and rarely fail to surprise and thrill. A relatively “quiet” issue, this one opens with Squire and his father Prince Robot discussing the suspiciously missing Princess Robot. Longtime readers know the truth behind that story. Next we find young Hazel in the ocean, not-quite being babysat by Ghüs, Friendo and Doff. A “mustached kingfish” leads photojournalist Doff off to this chapter’s climax at the end, but not before we discover Hazel’s dad Marko writing a novella that gets lovingly criticized (not too harshly) by his wife and Hazel’s …

Action Comics #1000: A Rather Fine Anniversary Issue

I really enjoyed DC Comics’ 80-page ACTION COMICS #1000 Anniversary issue, which also, coincidentally, marks the 80-year anniversary of Superman in printed comic form, having debuted on the stands in ACTION COMICS #1 on April 18, 1938 with a June cover date. I bought, in my opinion, the best looking available cover left on the shelf — the Joshua Middleton 1980s era variant (see below). An anthology of assorted stories honoring Superman, I would have to say the Peter J. Tomasi & Patrick Gleason story probably was the best of the bunch, but really all the stories contributed well to the overall product, I think. The contents could have maybe been sequenced differently, but really that’s a minor thing. Dan Jurgens’ lead-off story was very clever. “The Car” by Geoff Johns, Richard Donner & Olivier Coipel, and “Of Tomorrow” by Tom King & Clay Mann, were especially fine little vignettes, as was Brad Meltzer and John Cassaday’s “Faster Than a Speeding Bullet”. As for the closing story with Brian Michael Bendis making his debut on …

Gideon Falls #1 by Lemire and Sorrentino | Image Comics | 1st Issue Fetish

Gideon Falls #1 | By: Jeff Lemire, Andrea Sorrentino & Dave Stewart | Published: March 7, 2018 by Image Comics | From the Image Comics solicitation: A brand-new ongoing series from the acclaimed bestselling creative team of OLD MAN LOGAN and GREEN ARROW! The lives of a reclusive young man obsessed with a conspiracy in the city’s trash, and a washed-up Catholic priest arriving in a small town full of dark secrets, become intertwined around the mysterious legend of The Black Barn, an otherworldly building that is alleged to have appeared in both the city and the small town, throughout history, bringing death and madness in its wake. Rural mystery and urban horror collide in this character-driven meditation on obsession, mental illness, and faith. Writer Jeff Lemire and illustrator Andrea Sorrentino have reunited for a tour de force of a comic series that promises to deliver plenty of suspense and psychological horror. Lemire and Sorrentino have been developing GIDEON FALLS for years, always with the intention of it being created for Image Comics. Lemire has actually …

1st Issue Fetish – The Terrifics #1 by Reis and Lemire (DC Comics)

The Terrifics #1 | By: Ivan Reis and Jeff Lemire | Published: Feb 28, 2018 by DC Comics | Spinning out of DC Comics’ DARK NIGHTS: METAL event, as well as the publisher’s THE NEW AGE OF HEROES initiative (which is the launching pad for a number of all-new series featuring all-new characters or traditionally underused characters) comes THE TERRIFICS. This new series stars the super-genius Mr. Terrific, the now Nth-metallic Metamorpho, the funny and ever-elastic Plastic Man, and the intangible Phantom Girl. They are a newly-formed team of unlikely allies and must rely on one another to make their way back home. Bound together by fate — literally by a tragic accident — and united by the spirit of exploration and hope for tomorrow. A startling revelation on their return trip brings them face-to-face with a new mystery. What is that mystery? Well, let’s just say the last page has a cameo by a certain Doc Savage-inspired action hero who’s lost somewhere in the known/unknown universe. This first issue is a throw-you-in-the-middle-of-it, straight-ahead comic …

World Reader #1 Advanced Review | Amani Cooper

Writer: Jeff Loveness Cover: Juan Doe, Elizabeth Torque (Incentive variant) Artist: Juan Doe We were not the only ones in the multiverse. Life could be found in many places on many planets. That’s not so true anymore thanks to a growing deadly… The post World Reader #1 Advanced Review appeared first on Outright Geekery. via World Reader #1 Advanced Review — Outright Geekery

The Merc with a Mouth in a Movie | Thoughts on the Deadpool flick

For an action movie with a foulmouthed blabbermouth antihero, it’s pretty good. The opening sequence let’s you know right away (and any parents who may have foolishly brought their little ones expecting Spider-Man, Iron Man or Captain America fare) what the nature of this movie is going to be about and what kind of content you can expect. The opening credits laced throughout that first sequence are written in Deadpool’s unique perspective, which also informs the flavor of this raucous, ultra-violent movie. Right away we see Deadpool doing what he does best, delivering graphic and gruesome punishment to bad(der) guys, all the while quickly rolling off a litany of witty, wisecracking one-liners off his swift tongue for all the chuckles, usually in voice-over or while looking right at us, breaking the fourth wall. The camera angles in these first few sequences are daring for great comedic effect.  You come to realize without a doubt during this first zippy action sequence that that Ryan Reynolds is the ideal actor for Deadpool. Storywise, I think my favorite aspect …

Review: RED CITY #1 (Image Comics) by Daniel Corley and Mark Dos Santos

There’s nothing in comics I hate more than poo-pooing a new hopeful Image comic, but I just read Red City #1 and have come away a bit let down after admittedly hyping myself up for it due to its purported futuristic sci-fi/hardboiled crime concept. How was it? In a word: unimpressive. Firstly, it’s hardly hardboiled or noirish (at least not yet). And I believe I read somewhere that the creators really don’t intend for it to have the traditional dark trappings — the incessant pessimism and suppressive atmosphere — of hardboiled crime/noir. So a different take, which I totally support, but it’s probably best to simply not use the words “hardboiled” or “noir” when describing Red City. Only one issue in, the story has the makings for a fun series. But the exposition-disguised-as-first-person-narration really bogs down the narrative drive. I got bored pretty early with it because of its voice. Worst yet, in a book of this kind, this genre, the dialogue should really bounce and be the sharp hook, but unfortunately it was not. I totally understand the need for world-building, especially in …

Captain America #1 | Spoiler-Free Review

Fetish Flashback. * Originally posted @ World of Superheroes.com website. Archive now defunct. * Captain America #1 (Marvel) | “American Dreamers” Part 1 | (S) Ed Brubaker | (A) Steve McNiven & Mark Morales * Spoiler Free * “It’s probably hard to believe…but sometimes I actually forget I’m a man out of time” – Steve Rogers The all-new, but not-quite-all-that-different Captain America #1 (technically Volume 6 if you don’t count Captain America Comics from 1941) is a slight return to form of sorts for the star-spangled man-out-of time, soldier of misfortune and sentinel of liberty (coincidence that all of those start with an ‘s’?). Long-time Cap writer Ed Brubaker, who has been chronicling the adventures of Marvel’s time-displaced Boy Scout for the better part of a decade, and Steve McNiven (he of Marvel Civil War fame) bring Steve Rogers, now the undisputed Captain America again, out of the shadows  and murkiness, which suited the dark intrigue of the previous volume’s tone. This volume apparently aims to be slightly brighter with a feel that is more typical of a superhero adventure comic. …