All posts filed under: Writing Advice

“The One Habit Every Writer Needs. Right now.”

Post #540 Guest Blog | The following quotes are from the Medium blog post ‘The One Habit Every Writer Needs. Right now.‘ by @shauntagrimes Here are the steps: Choose a goal. When I say teeny, tiny, I’m not kidding. You want a goal so small that it would actually be more difficult, psychologically, to skip it than it would be to just sit down and do the damn thing. My go to teeny, tiny writing goal is ten minutes. No matter what, even on my worst day, even when I’m sick, even when I’m travelling, even when I have a million other things to wedge into 24 hours, I write for ten minutes. If for some reason ten minutes became something I could skip — if it lost it’s status as the goal that’s so small I’d rather do it than skip it — I’d shrink it. Five minutes. One minute. One page. One paragraph. Hell, one word. Seriously. If that’s what it takes, set a goal of writing one new word on your manuscript everyday. The secret of the teeny, …

“Create something today even if it sucks”

Guest Blog | The following quotes are from the Medium blog post ‘Create something today even if it sucks’ by @emilywarna. Click the title for the full article. We all have those days. The days of writer’s block; the days of beating ourselves into the ground over not being able to produce. When we think every piece of content we create is terrible. When we think our mind is letting us down. We often forget that being good takes practice. Consistency requires dedication. Dedication to the craft, and dedication to yourself. So ask yourself: ‘Who am I creating for?’ Reassess who you’re trying to impress. Remember, you’re writing for yourself just as much as for your audience. By producing piece after piece, you’re setting yourself up for future victories. You’re identifying your strengths and weaknesses, how you function best, what circumstances you thrive under. You’re identifying your creative hours.  

“What to do if no one reads what you write.” | Shaunta Grimes

Unread. Ignored. Forsaken. That’s something, simply as people, we all fear, no? Specifically, it’s perhaps a writer’s greatest fear? Certainly one of mine. But there is a kind of irony in the event that situation occurs, so said author/writer whisperer Shaunta Grimes some months back . . . “I know how it feels to screw up your nerve and post something in public for the entire world to see — and then realize that the whole world doesn’t really care. They aren’t even paying attention. Before I tell you what to do when no one is reading what you write, I want to share a story with you that I hope will help you understand a hard, rather beautiful truth. If it’s possible for you to write something that no one reads — then no one is paying attention. And there’s real freedom in that idea. Once you realize that no one is paying attention, you can let go of the voice screaming in your head that you better not fuck up, because if you do the whole entire …

Nic Pizzolatto on Writing

I recently finished reading Pizzolatto’s debut southern crime novel Galveston. While reviewing it on Goodreads I stumbled across this video. After hearing something he said here it got me I’m thinking maybe that’s been my problem over the last 25 years, because I’ve always also been a musician, maybe not full-time, but certainly in tandem with also being a writer. Music came first, some five years prior to writing. I can’t live without either, though. About the Author: Nic Pizzolatto is an American novelist, screenwriter, and producer. Pizzolatto was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. He was educated at the University of Arkansas and Louisiana State University. The author of two books, he taught fiction and literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Chicago, and DePauw University before leaving academia in 2010. He is the creator, writer, executive producer of the HBO crime drama TRUE DETECTIVE.

“How to Write the ‘Other’ (Without Being a Jerk)” | Samia Rahman

by Samia Rahman So, how can you write about issues or experiences that you find to be culturally alien, yet do it well? Perhaps the first step is to acknowledge that embarking upon such a task comes with responsibility, and you might want to think carefully about your motivation. Is this a subject that you can do justice to, providing voices for stories that may not otherwise be heard? Objectivity and authenticity are notoriously difficult to achieve. Be honest with yourself and constructively consider your strengths and limitations. Ultimately, if you have the self-belief then go for it! READ: “How to Write the ‘Other’ (Without Being a Jerk)” @ProWritingAid https://writingcooperative.com/how-to-write-the-other-without-being-a-jerk-18a04902bf4

This Year You Write Your Novel

Here’s a bit of writer’s advice by multiple award-winning author Walter Mosley from his 2007 book on writing, This Year You Write Your Novel, published by Little, Brown and Company.  An excerpt from the first chapter follows. The General Disciplines That Every Writer Needs Writing every day The first thing you have to know about writing is that it is something you must do every day-every morning or every night, whatever time it is that you have. Ideally, the time you decide on is also the time when you do your best work. There are two reasons for this rule: getting the work done and connecting with your unconscious mind. If you want to finish this novel of yours within a year, you have to get to work! There’s not a moment to lose. There’s no time to wait for inspiration. Getting your words down on the page takes time. How much? I write three hours every morning. It’s the first thing I do, Monday through Sunday, fifty-two weeks a year. Some days I miss but …

Trying to Write as a Pantser | Shannon A. Thompson

Originally posted on Shannon A Thompson:
I’m a pantser for the first time. What’s a pantser? Someone who writes a book with no plan, as opposed to a plotter, who, you know, plots. Normally, I plot like crazy. I have plots for my plots. (Also known as subplots.) And though I almost always deviate from my original plans, I always have a plan. But lately, I was feeling a little bogged down by all that planning. I yearned for adventure. For mystery. For absolute chaos. Like a road trip with no destination ahead. Just me and the road and whatever will happen. So, I decided my first book of 2017 would be written in perfect pantser style, full speed ahead. I’m not going to lie, I thought I would crash and burn. In fact, I expected to. But that wasn’t the case. Let me explain the differences by comparing my normal plotter ways and my current pantser adventure. The Idea Plotter: Disclaimer: Almost all of my books start off as a dream, and this one…

How To Make 2017 Your Best Writing Year In 5 Easy Steps — All About Writing and more

We made it. We got through the dumpster fire that was 2016 and finally reached 2017. With each new year comes new year resolutions, but if you’re like me, most years your resolutions don’t last more than 30 days. At the start of 2016 I wanted what most people want: to exercise, eat healthier, sleep […] via How To Make 2017 Your Best Writing Year In 5 Easy Steps — All About Writing and more

Quotes | Bob Thurber on Writing

Bob Thurber (Paperboy: A Dysfunctional Novel; Nothing but Trouble), one of the finest writers in the English language (and a personal acquaintance), has been a literary mentor of mine for over fifteen years now. I recently stumbled across some more sage writing advice from him over on his Goodreads page. “Remember . . . keystrokes are hammer taps. Get words on paper. Don’t worry about connections, character or plot. Work for an hour. Promise yourself an hour. Do nothing else but move your fingers. Make coarse shapes. Follow any emotion that pops up but never impose emotion, never fake it, and don’t make up your mind or your heart ahead of time. Understand you don’t know what you’re doing. That’s why you’re here. Rough it out. Anything goes. You can decide later what any piece of text looks like, what it might mean. Don’t stop. Don’t question. Don’t quit. Don’t stop to read what you wrote. Move your fingers. You mind will have no other option but to keep up. Remember that writer’s block is merely …