All posts filed under: Writing

The Call

++ Post #547 ~ 66 words of dialogue ++ Created: 8.8.2018 by BLR – Hullo? – Hullo. Is that you? – Last time I checked. Who is this? – You know who this is. – Mmhm. What do ya want? – For some reason you’ve been showing up in my dreams lately. I just wanted to make sure you were still alive. – Why do you care? – Well, even though I hate your two-faced, lying, conniving, backstabbing ass, it doesn’t mean I want you dead. Yet. Fin. Inspired by a true event. Sorta. It’s complicated.

“What to do if no one reads what you write.” | Shaunta Grimes

Unread. Ignored. Forsaken. That’s something, simply as people, we all fear, no? Specifically, it’s perhaps a writer’s greatest fear? Certainly one of mine. But there is a kind of irony in the event that situation occurs, so said author/writer whisperer Shaunta Grimes some months back . . . “I know how it feels to screw up your nerve and post something in public for the entire world to see — and then realize that the whole world doesn’t really care. They aren’t even paying attention. Before I tell you what to do when no one is reading what you write, I want to share a story with you that I hope will help you understand a hard, rather beautiful truth. If it’s possible for you to write something that no one reads — then no one is paying attention. And there’s real freedom in that idea. Once you realize that no one is paying attention, you can let go of the voice screaming in your head that you better not fuck up, because if you do the whole entire …

Brother, Can You Spare Some Prose?

~ Notebook #11 ~ When you’re looking to reincorporate lean muscle to your prose and you turn to the maestros of the minimalist, clean, no frills, straight-to-the-point (and straight-to-the-heart) narrative technique. I have a tendency in daily speech and writing to use a lot of complex sentences (and parenthetical asides) and when I’m not mindful of it, I tend to let that creep into my prose, especially when I’ve not been writing fiction narratives for a good while (an obvious drawback to mostly writing in a nonfiction capacity daily for so many years now). I’ve been reading both Elmore Leonard and Bob Thurber since the late 90s (starting with Thurber at an online workshop just prior to his entering award-winning publishing success). Both of these authors cite Ernest Hemingway as a major influence on them. Only makes sense that I finally dig deeper into the guy at the top of this literary family tree I’ve adopted, so I hit up my local public library for Mr. Hemingway’s collection, and since I don’t (for some odd reason) …

“How to Write the ‘Other’ (Without Being a Jerk)” | Samia Rahman

by Samia Rahman So, how can you write about issues or experiences that you find to be culturally alien, yet do it well? Perhaps the first step is to acknowledge that embarking upon such a task comes with responsibility, and you might want to think carefully about your motivation. Is this a subject that you can do justice to, providing voices for stories that may not otherwise be heard? Objectivity and authenticity are notoriously difficult to achieve. Be honest with yourself and constructively consider your strengths and limitations. Ultimately, if you have the self-belief then go for it! READ: “How to Write the ‘Other’ (Without Being a Jerk)” @ProWritingAid https://writingcooperative.com/how-to-write-the-other-without-being-a-jerk-18a04902bf4

This Year You Write Your Novel

Here’s a bit of writer’s advice by multiple award-winning author Walter Mosley from his 2007 book on writing, This Year You Write Your Novel, published by Little, Brown and Company.  An excerpt from the first chapter follows. The General Disciplines That Every Writer Needs Writing every day The first thing you have to know about writing is that it is something you must do every day-every morning or every night, whatever time it is that you have. Ideally, the time you decide on is also the time when you do your best work. There are two reasons for this rule: getting the work done and connecting with your unconscious mind. If you want to finish this novel of yours within a year, you have to get to work! There’s not a moment to lose. There’s no time to wait for inspiration. Getting your words down on the page takes time. How much? I write three hours every morning. It’s the first thing I do, Monday through Sunday, fifty-two weeks a year. Some days I miss but …

Trying to Write as a Pantser | Shannon A. Thompson

Originally posted on Shannon A Thompson:
I’m a pantser for the first time. What’s a pantser? Someone who writes a book with no plan, as opposed to a plotter, who, you know, plots. Normally, I plot like crazy. I have plots for my plots. (Also known as subplots.) And though I almost always deviate from my original plans, I always have a plan. But lately, I was feeling a little bogged down by all that planning. I yearned for adventure. For mystery. For absolute chaos. Like a road trip with no destination ahead. Just me and the road and whatever will happen. So, I decided my first book of 2017 would be written in perfect pantser style, full speed ahead. I’m not going to lie, I thought I would crash and burn. In fact, I expected to. But that wasn’t the case. Let me explain the differences by comparing my normal plotter ways and my current pantser adventure. The Idea Plotter: Disclaimer: Almost all of my books start off as a dream, and this one…

How To Make 2017 Your Best Writing Year In 5 Easy Steps — All About Writing and more

We made it. We got through the dumpster fire that was 2016 and finally reached 2017. With each new year comes new year resolutions, but if you’re like me, most years your resolutions don’t last more than 30 days. At the start of 2016 I wanted what most people want: to exercise, eat healthier, sleep […] via How To Make 2017 Your Best Writing Year In 5 Easy Steps — All About Writing and more

Quote | Clive Barker on Characters

This week I’ve found a poignant quote from another writer I’ve looked up to since I started writing in the mid-90s, someone’s whose imagination and vision I greatly admire. Like Anne Rice from a few weeks back, Clive Barker is another fellow Libra. This quote comes from an old interview I stumbled across that was conducted in 1991 by W.C. Stroby for Writer’s Digest. WD: When the story ideas begin to get very bizarre or complex, what can you do to make sure you don’t lose that sort of emotional under-pinning? BARKER: The first thing is you’ve got to believe in the characters. You’ve got to be thinking with the characters and you’ve got to be within their skins. If you’re within their skins then their response to any situation, however bizarre it is, is going to be based upon your sense of them. Any writer’s belief in his or her characters – or the situations in which the characters find themselves – is central to his ability to convince the audience. As a writer, you have …

Writing Advice from Neil Gaiman

This has made the rounds to various web places over the years, most notably in an article at The Guardian. 8 Rules for Writers by Neil Gaiman 1 Write. 2 Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down. 3 Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it. 4 Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is. 5 Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong. 6 Fix it. Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving. 7 Laugh at your own jokes. 8 The main rule of writing is that if you …