All posts tagged: Advice

Nic Pizzolatto on Writing

I recently finished reading Pizzolatto’s debut southern crime novel Galveston. While reviewing it on Goodreads I stumbled across this video. After hearing something he said here it got me I’m thinking maybe that’s been my problem over the last 25 years, because I’ve always also been a musician, maybe not full-time, but certainly in tandem with also being a writer. Music came first, some five years prior to writing. I can’t live without either, though. About the Author: Nic Pizzolatto is an American novelist, screenwriter, and producer. Pizzolatto was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. He was educated at the University of Arkansas and Louisiana State University. The author of two books, he taught fiction and literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Chicago, and DePauw University before leaving academia in 2010. He is the creator, writer, executive producer of the HBO crime drama TRUE DETECTIVE. Advertisements

Why Writers Shouldn’t Blog Too Much | Vincent Mars

Blogging can take over your writing life. You may have reached a point where you have to ask yourself this question — is blogging distracting me from my more ambitious work? Many of us have started our blogs thinking it’s good for our writing careers. We need more than good writing if we want to be writers, we know. We need the exposure that a blog can bring us. We need an online reputation. We need connections. Blogging can help bring us all of these. But every minute you spend writing a blog post or reading comments is a minute you don’t spend working on your larger writing projects. And there will be many days when blogging will seem so much easier than revising that long manuscript you’ve been working on for years. READ MORE via Why Writers Shouldn’t Blog Too Much — boy with a hat

Advice from Warren Ellis, Internet Jesus

In this week’s edition of his newsletter, Orbital Operations, writer of all trades and legendary Internet Jesus Warren Ellis offered the following bits of sage advice for us all to perform our own lifehack in these unprecedented times. Take heed, if you want to survive. “If you’re on social media, make your account private, and use it to be social. Use it with your friends.  If you rely on social media for news, do this. 1) Don’t use Facebook for news. I mean, just don’t. Facebook’s values are not your own, and they have their own rules for what you get to see. So just don’t. 2) Twitter has a function called Lists. So go to a Twitter account, press the little cog icon on the right, and select Add Or Remove From Lists. Create a list, and you can add people to it without actually following them. The term “attention economy” seems to be making a comeback in 2017. Your attention is valuable. Also, the confusing and scattering of your attention is valuable. Overwhelming you …

Guest Blog: 7 Writing Rules For Fiction (from A Writer’s Path via Kate Foster)

Originally posted on A Writer's Path:
  Overwhelmed by fiction-writing advice? Me too, and I’m an editor as well as a writer. Everyone and anyone who has a blog or website seems to be keen on throwing in their penny’s worth. A lot of it is genuinely good advice. But what works for them won’t necessarily be right for you. Want proof? Here, in these six sentences, I’ve broken numerous ‘rules’ that would make grammar lovers wince. I’m not concerned, however, because this article is fairly informal in tone and what’s most important to me is that my voice shines through. So with this opening paragraph, I give you my fiction-writing rules.   Number One: First and foremost, let your voice carry your writing. The following rules are based on recurring problems I see whilst editing fiction manuscripts.   Rule Number Two: Always move the plot forward. Flashbacks or trips into the past might be frowned upon by many, but I believe they are fine if revisiting a character’s history in some way progresses…