All posts tagged: Ed Brubaker

Comic Book Fetish Fave of the Week #3

January 2017 | New Comics Week 3 — Kill or Be Killed #5 (Image Comics) Story: Ed Brubaker Art: Elizabeth Breitweiser, Sean Phillips Cover: Sean Phillips Published: January 18, 2017 NEW STORY ARC. BRUBAKER & PHILLIPS’ runaway bestseller just keeps going! Now that we’ve seen the origin of our killer, it’s only a matter of time before the NYPD realizes they have a vigilante on their streets. The first issue of this new arc releases the same day as the first KILL OR BE KILLED trade, and is a perfect jumping on point for readers who’ve missed out so far. And every issue has all the backpage extras that BRUBAKER & PHILLIPS fans have come to expect. – See more at: https://imagecomics.com/comics/releases/kill-or-be-killed-5#sthash.Yu6Nk4mf.dpuf Advertisements

Quote/Advice | Ed Brubaker on Health & Work/Life Balance

Celebrated and award-winning comics/graphic novels author Ed Brubaker (CRIMINAL, VELVET, CAPTAIN AMERICA, THE WINTER SOLDIER), one of my faves, shared some sage writerly advice and wisdom today in his latest newsletter From the Desk of Ed Brubaker, of which I must make note. On health: “If you are a writer, if sitting and thinking followed by sitting and typing is what you want to do for a living, I can’t urge you more strongly to get regular cardio and get up from your desk a lot and stretch. I can’t stress enough how easy it is to fall into bad habits in this profession that can cause you major health issues. In my career I’ve had to deal with repetitive strain injuries, tendonitis, chronic TMJ pain (from clenching my jaw when I get lost in writing) and lower back problems. And recently, while trying to get back into good cardio shape, I injured my ankle – the cause, having my foot bent weird while I typed.” Actually, that’s good advice for anyone who works at a desk for …

Third-Party Noir | Thoughts on The Fade Out #2

The Fade Out #2 (Image) – I’m very happy for Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips on the success of the sold-out first issue and that others have taken a huge liking to the series. However, for me, I mentioned it with the first issue and now with #2 it’s hit me hard: my number one problem with this book is the third-person narration employed by writer Brubaker. It’s just too distant and contains too much telling. There’s a reason that overly exposition-y style is not en vogue anymore (unless you’re Chris Claremont, Neil Gaiman or Todd McFarlane). For the better part of two decades comics have largely (and wisely) used first-person narration because in a visual medium it keeps the narrative intimate and grounded in character. Watch a movie with third-person voice-over narration and tell me that isn’t off-putting. Prose in a novel is one thing, but if I can see the character(s) then I want them to tell me their story, not an outside/invisible narrator. In contrast, I think the first-person narration is at …

Promo: VELVET by Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting

Edit I‘ve just finished reading the first arc of VELVET by Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting. It’s a really classy book…a spy caper/paranoid thriller book with style and grace. If you enjoyed what these two did on Captain America and the Winter Soldier books in the past, you’ll likely dig this too. I think it’s Brubaker’s best work to date, and Steve Epting’s art is even sleeker than it was on those Marvel books. Love the female lead, Velvet Templeton. Trade collection of the first 5 issues comes out on June 18th for $9.99. https://imagecomics.com/comics/releases/velvet-vol.-1-before-the-living-tp  

Captain America #1 | Spoiler-Free Review

Fetish Flashback. * Originally posted @ World of Superheroes.com website. Archive now defunct. * Captain America #1 (Marvel) | “American Dreamers” Part 1 | (S) Ed Brubaker | (A) Steve McNiven & Mark Morales * Spoiler Free * “It’s probably hard to believe…but sometimes I actually forget I’m a man out of time” – Steve Rogers The all-new, but not-quite-all-that-different Captain America #1 (technically Volume 6 if you don’t count Captain America Comics from 1941) is a slight return to form of sorts for the star-spangled man-out-of time, soldier of misfortune and sentinel of liberty (coincidence that all of those start with an ‘s’?). Long-time Cap writer Ed Brubaker, who has been chronicling the adventures of Marvel’s time-displaced Boy Scout for the better part of a decade, and Steve McNiven (he of Marvel Civil War fame) bring Steve Rogers, now the undisputed Captain America again, out of the shadows  and murkiness, which suited the dark intrigue of the previous volume’s tone. This volume apparently aims to be slightly brighter with a feel that is more typical of a superhero adventure comic. …