All posts tagged: NaNoWriMo

Now That NaNoWriMo is Over . . .

Now that NaNoWriMo 2018 is over I can pretty much relax in the month of December. Some things I put on hold I can now dive back into again, first of which is a lot of reading. I bought all kinds of books in October, checked out a few at the library in November and I have a huge stack of backlogged comics and graphic novels to get back to. I’m also in the works of building several music playlists on Spotify to share with the world as I get back to being the little kid DJ I wanted to be at age 8 (before I discovered MTV and wanted to be a musician myself). I think the gift of music is one of the greatest things in the world and sharing music gives me a ton of joy. Speaking of music, I did find myself adopting an acoustic state of mind and grabbing my acoustic guitars for a few spells during November. I’m tempted to resume songwriting for yet another solo acoustic project, but …

A Guitar Is Always Nearby

On the eve of Thanksgiving I was up in my bedroom alone while all the girls were downstairs watching this season’s Hallmark Christmas movies with their mom/aunt. I was getting sleepy really, having burned the candle longer this week than I should have. So I was starting to come to terms with the possibility that I was going to finally miss a day (night, really) of NaNoWriMo productivity after going a RECORD 20 DAYS STRAIGHT this year. I truly did not want to break the streak, which is just a personal goal of accomplishment, but I was a little too drained to muster the mental energy (I’m sure that whatever mental reserves I had left were exhausted after getting home from work and reading seven or so chapters of ACROSS THE UNIVERSE by Beth Revis). An easy distraction for me in general is listening to music, whether it’s old favorites or discovering new-to-me artists and their tunes. Last night I was listening to various acoustic songs and since I have my two acoustic guitars in …

The Writ, The Read & The Rock – 11.19.18

It’s been a while since I’ve done the weekly look back, so here is a retro report on the past week or so . . . ++ The Writ ++ So since the start of November I have been participating – for the third year in a row now – in NaNoWrimo (National Novel Writing Month for the rare uninitiated). In the past I hadn’t lasted more than a few days to a week at most. This year I’ve survived nearly three weeks, mainly by finally embracing not giving into my usual OCD about editing every word, phrase, sentence, paragraph and page to some semblance of “perfection”. I’m also not sticking to one novel project, instead just doing word vomits on multiple projects as they arrive to me because as always this creative mind of mine is always littered with a multitude of ideas – old and new. It’s just how I’ve always rolled, so why fight it? As I write this very paragraph I’m currently tallied at 17,852. ++ The Read ++ As a …

NaNoWrimo: Day 5

I’m under 5k on Day 5. Clearly not the hare so that makes me the tortoise. AKA King Molasses. AKA the undisputed Emperor of  S  L  O  W.  AKA Slowpoke Rodriguez. But, at least I’m doing good at breaking the habits of old. More on that in a later post. At any rate here’s a nice graphic. #NaNoWriMo2018 #Day5 #iWrite

“NaNo Prep: How to Go From Plotless to Polished” | Derek Murphy

November is just around the corner, and as we gear up, we’re sharing advice on how you can best prepare for a month of writing. Today, author and designer Derek Murphy shares his advice on how to turn a messy work-in-progress into a polished draft in November: NaNoWriMo is a great opportunity to push your boundaries and see how much writing you can get done in thirty days. If it’s your first time shooting for 50K, write whatever is easiest for you. However, if you’ve been doing NaNoWriMo for a few years and have struggled to turn your newly generated manuscript into an actual book that sells, here’s some advice that should help: Save a Darling—Plot Ahead First of all, if you started your story with very little plotting, it’s likely you have dozens of powerful scenes but no backbone to hold it all together. And it’s very difficult to go back and operate on your manuscript after it’s finished. “Kill your darlings” is good advice, but painful for a reason. It’s hard to cut the stuff you love—but if …

The Novelling Month Approaches — The Writing Tree

We’re already over halfway through September, which means November is fast approaching. For many writers, November means Nanowrimo, the annual challenge to write a novel in just one month. This blog post gives you some tips to help you make the most of the month, and improve your chances of success. Is Nanowrimo for you? […] via The Novelling Month Approaches — The Writing Tree

Notebook 9 | Waving the White Flag

I’m baaaack! Yeah, I wasn’t gone long and as I stated last week, you know what this quick return means. Details below. How ’bout that NaNoWriMo experiment? So what did I learn within my first couple of days of NaNoWriMo? My new fiction prose is VERY rusty. I seem to be sharper when working on my previously written prose when revising and editing. And I can flow here in a nonfiction or even a journalistic mode with ease. I suppose my previous years in the role of a fiction editor as well as spending the last 5 years mostly writing nonfiction will do that to a fella’s fiction flow. Contrary to my optimism, I can’t use a first-person POV for a long-form prose narrative like a novel. Aside from very short fiction, I am far outside my comfort zone when stuck with the lack of narrative control that is 1st person POV. That lack of narrative authority. My best prose writing days might just be behind me, or so my mind, lacking confidence, has been whispering …

Reggie Lutz on NaNoWriMo

It is almost here… NANOWRIMO – http://wp.me/p5VuTN-6u Old writing buddy and ‘friend of the program’ Reggie Lutz shares some sage words. She’s on-point as usual, so do yourself a favor and have a read of her post regarding NaNoWriMo. Here’s an excerpt: One of the most important things around fiction writing is learning how to finish work that you start. This is a road toward a complete first draft. While the word count requirement to win NanoWrimo is not, strictly speaking, book length, it is enough word count to determine, at the end of it all, whether your story idea will work once you’ve polished it. Whether or not you have something workable at the end of it, you will have learned whether the kamikaze approach to writing 1,700 words a day works for you. That’s not nothing. if you are a person who has already started and finished long work then maybe the challenge for you is producing content at a relatively blistering pace. Doing this can teach you how to work with deadlines and …

NaNoWriMo 2016 – I’m In!

#NaNoWriMo #InItToWinIt So this past weekend I got myself signed up for NaNoWriMo 2016. I’ve been wanting to do this since about 2008 or so, but have never fully committed. When I first became aware of this National Novel Writing Month I was hosting a novel writing workshop over on Zoetrope.com (the Virtual Studio) where we posted novel chapters weekly for reads, reviews and discussion. It was a basically a support group for new novelists The novels I was flirting with writing back then simply would not have been ideal for something like NaNoWriMo because I am a meticulous plotter and in order to realistically reach the goal of 50,000 words in one month’s time (whew!), you have to embrace writing with little-to-no editing as you go along. Pantsing, it’s called — writing by the seat of your pants completely untethered by the act of editing and revising. I’ve been in hardcore, OCD edited mode since the first days of being an editor in 2000. You see, when you’re an editor of other people’s work …

Ruckin’ With You | 10.16.16 | I Am Returned

Family vacation is over. A good time was had. But it’s over and today I deal with the looming return to work on a gloomy overcast day with some rain after a week of blue skies and sunshine. Woe is me, right? At any rate, overall we enjoyed our time in the mid-North states of Pennsylvania, New York and Ohio. On My Mind I arrived home with a great deal on my mind in terms of stories and writing. It seems my intense focus on the launch of my Library of Works website, RUCKERPEDIA, has got me so immersed in my past work that it’s served to inspire me on to current and future work. This past year the concept of a writer’s body of work, particularly MY body of work, has been very intriguing to me. Heck, it’s a huge reason why I built the RUCKERPEDIA website – inherently as an archive it serves as a virtual monument to my more than two decades as a writer. Essentially, were I to meet an untimely demise, …