All posts tagged: Writing

Retreat

~ The Morning Muse #12 ~ Note: This was supposed to be posted a few months ago (mid-October to be exact), but for some unknown reason I let it sit longer than intended. And come to think of it, yesterday’s Resolution: Regain and Retain Attention is a great companion piece to this one, actually. As life and the world become increasingly disappointing, an increasingly cynical fella who once was brimming with optimism for the future now wants to retreat and self-indulge even more than he normally does into books and writing and music — Read|Write|Rock. The key word is retreat, though, not escape. It’s more like a strategic mental regrouping of oneself amid the unending battle in the war that is, arguably, the social (and political) decline. As I immerse myself in books, my goal is to attain a better perspective on human psychology, the ever-perplexing human condition and the ways of the world. As I engage in writing, the goal is to not only to unleash the never-ending flow of ideas and stories that …

The Quiet Hours

At last the house is quiet and still. Well, mostly. There’s a cricket outside the living room window chirping incessantly and the Lady of the Manor is in the recliner reading a book and yawning occasionally. Earlier today there was a small family gathering here to celebrate my birthday belatedly (the momentous occasion of my having made another successful trip ‘round the sun again occurred this past Tuesday). The wife served up a nice baked pasta with chicken meal (kinda like a casserole, I suppose) along with Caesar salad, garlic bread and for dessert a choice of chocolate cake with fudge icing, carrot cake and vanilla ice cream. All of it chased down by either sweet tea or ice water. Quality family time followed the eating festivities. All and all a simple, low-key way to celebrate one’s arrival upon this planet. Now, I debate how to best take advantage of these quiet ours. I am often torn between the desire to read and the urge to write or play guitar (I did some strumming on …

“How to Become a Prolific Writer” | Nicole Bianchi

The powerful process that will help you write more in 2017 Have you ever looked at the bibliographies of prolific writers and wondered how on earth they write so many books? Do they just have an incredible amount of time to devote to writing? A motor inside their hands that keeps them typing away? A writing refuge where they can hide to block out all distractions from the world? Actually, the answer is much simpler. These prolific writers usually don’t lead unconventional lives nor do they possess any superhuman powers. Rather they have developed a single habit that anyone can master: setting a daily word count goal and following through every day. Read on to discover the daily word counts of several prolific authors (some of these may surprise you!), and the best way to set your own daily word count goal and follow through each day. Click the link to continue “How to Become a Prolific Writer” @NicoleJBianchi https://writingcooperative.com/how-to-become-a-prolific-writer-ba23683675ba

Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk Explains His Writing Method With A Disturbing Story | Lowlife Magazine

(Warning: Strong/graphic content) As part of the Q&A Podcast Fight Club 15th Anniversary Special, in which host Jeff Goldsmith sat down with novelist Chuck Palahniuk (Choke, Survivor) and screenwriter Jim Uhls (Jumper) to talk about the 1999 film, Palahniuk was asked, among other things, about his writing method, including his inspirations, habits, etc. In response, he proceeded […] via (For Those Looking To Write Transgressive Fiction), Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk Explains His Writing Method With A Disturbing Story — LOWLIFE MAGAZINE

“15 of the Best Free Web Applications for Writers” | Nicole Bianchi

~ Words by Nicole Bianchi ~ Once upon a time, the typewriter was the only piece of technology a writer had to make his work easier. Now we not only have computers, but we can also access an endless array of useful writing tools on the Internet. Best of all, many of these web applications are absolutely free! But it takes time to hunt down these apps (time you could be spending on writing), so I’ve done the work for you and put together a list of my favorites. I hope these web applications will help you with your next writing project! Read on to discover 15 of the best free web applications for writers: “15 of the Best Free Web Applications for Writers” @NicoleJBianchi https://writingcooperative.com/15-of-the-best-free-web-applications-for-writers-fadea650fda1

“How to Avoid Distractions and Finish What You” | Sarah Cooper

~ Words & Humor By Sarah Cooper ~ My tried-and-true process for getting stuff done Ever wonder how I get so much done? Me too. That’s why I decided to document my productivity methods so everyone can learn from them. Here’s my step-by-step process for being incredibly productive. * * * First, I realize it’s 4pm and I haven’t gotten anything done yet. This makes me panic a bit. However, instead of accepting the panic, or pushing through it, I pile it on by realizing it’s already April and I’ve gotten nothing done this year. Then I torture myself with thinking about how I’m almost 40, and I have maybe only 30 good years of my life left. Then I think about how something horrible could happen to me at any moment — a disease, a frozen yogurt accident, anything — and how mad I’d be at myself for wasting so much time doing absolutely nothing. READ MORE: “How to Avoid Distractions and Finish What You” @sarahcpr https://blog.sarahcpr.com/how-to-avoid-distractions-and-finish-what-you-start-in-the-age-of-the-f6024684c2b

“Why I Keep an Idea Journal” | Nicole Bianchi

~ Words by Nicole Bianchi ~ Leonardo da Vinci. Marie Curie. Thomas Edison. Beatrix Potter. What did all four of these people have in common? Not only were they all highly motivated and creative individuals, but they also all kept some form of an idea journal. An idea journal is not a diary where you have to record all of the details of your day. Rather, it’s a place where you jot down daily goals, achievements, observations, ideas for projects, quotes, or other bits of inspiration. If you’re working on a project, you can fill your idea journal with updates on your progress, thoughts on how to improve the project, and anything else that motivates you. A writer’s idea journal might be filled with ideas for stories or articles or blog posts. An artist’s might contain sketches or inspirations for drawings. Ultimately, the idea journal exists as a private place to plant your ideas and watch them grow. Here are four reasons why I keep an idea journal — READ MORE: “Why I Keep an Idea Journal” @NicoleJBianchi …

“This is how to override your writer brain. Publish anyway.” | Shaunta Grimes

I gotta say that Shaunta Grimes really hits it home in this one (with humor too). I can certainly identify with part of what she’s discussing here.  A few words by Shaunta Grimes: “I didn’t make a conscious decision not to publish. It just happened. And then it kept happening for more than two years. As evidenced by the zero fiction that I published. I was still writing. I’ve written three novels and a dozen short stories in that time. They’re nice and cozy on my hard drive, wrapped in a thick layer of my fear of publishing them. A fiction writer’s brain is a crafty trickster. It’ll convince itself that writing a whole shit ton of blog posts and MFA packets is the same thing as writing. It’ll rationalize that finishing novels is the end game and totally blow off publishing like it’s no big thing.” And . . . “Your writer brain will do everything it can to protect you from the hard, hard work of creating a story and then putting your baby on …

“How to use Active Reading to Become a Better Writer” | Jed Herne

Intro: Authors often discuss how reading improves your writing. However, there’s a big difference between passive and active reading, and if you’re serious about using published novels to improve your writing you must learn how to do the latter. When you read passively, you consume a novel as entertainment — you’re trawling through without paying attention to detail. This lets you form a broad judgement (“this is great!”). By contrast, active reading involves specific focus on an author’s craft. It is to passive reading what fly-fishing is to trawling. Active reading encourages your judgement to be precise (“this is great because the chapter endings created lots of suspense!”). Read: “How to use Active Reading to Become a Better Writer” by Jed Herne @ProWritingAid https://writingcooperative.com/how-to-use-active-reading-to-become-a-better-writer-b60356bdd212